More of our travels.

A shame this photo is a bit on the blurry side but the arches in this building were beautiful. It is the old town hall in Arnhem, somehow it remained standing when all around it the town was pretty much flattened during WW2, the walls are riddled with gouges and scars. My grandad was a paratrooper and dropped at the Battle of Arnhem, was taken in by a Dutch family and sheltered but eventually captured and sent to a POW camp. Years after the war he and my grandma and my dad and his brother used to go and visit the family who had looked after him, so I always felt I wanted to go and see where this all happened. It was a very odd feeling, quite surreal to stand and look at the bridge there being just a normal bridge full of cars and people just getting on with living. The small museum at the foot of the bridge was tiny but packed full of information and the gentleman we spoke to there gave us a heart rending story of his own experience of Operation Market Garden as he lived in Arnhem then as now but was 9 years old at the time. I thought he was very brave to tell his story to strangers, he said he rarely tells visitors so we were very touched.

On a lighter note the image above is I think a pelican which is something that I’ve seen crop up on pots many times, it’s high on the wall of a building in the red light district of Amsterdam. The one below I can’t remember where it was but it made me laugh.

The pictures below is of some of the weird and wonderful creatures on the fireplace with the Adam and Eve figures that I mentioned yesterday.
Theses jars are in Niek and Pim’s showroom, look at those feet. Lovely things.
Another picture of their showroom, it doesn’t show the pots too well unfortunately but you can see some. There is a wide range of pots and more sculptural things in there, lots to make you ooh and ahh, it was hugely exciting for me to see so much of their work all together.

These two little bowls belong to Niek and Pim and they did tell me the makers name but stupidly I have forgotten. I did think though that Ron would very much appreciate the drawings, especially the fish.
Last but not least for tonight, my lovely friends Christine and Rodger gave me one of Pim’s plates for my birthday and while we were over there Pim gave us another so that we could have one each to eat off. We have just used them for dinner this evening and very pleasant to use they were too. Thank you all.

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5 Responses to More of our travels.

  1. Ron says:

    Hannah, great post. Really great to see all the pots. If you remember the name of the person who made the bowls let me know. They are great, as are the drawings on the tiles. Pim’s plates are so well done. Real eye candy all of this.

  2. Hi, looks to me as if those bowls are by Robert Montaudoin. If I am right he works in France. It is so good of you to share your experiences with us, it’s great fun seeing other peoples pots.Glad you got some to keep as well-always good!!

  3. ang says:

    hey hannah that little piranha bowls is a bit special isn’t he… and the plates are they hand built? thye have lovely decoration, what a great trip you had..

  4. Hannah says:

    Thanks Margaret, yes that sounds right I think he was French. Yes Pim’s plates are slabs, lovely aren’t they, very free and fun.

  5. Those tiles are fantastic! The pelican motif by the way is the classic ‘Pelican in her Piety”. In my T H White ‘Bestiary’ he explains that the Pelican is excessively devoted to her children but as they grow up they flap their parents in the face and their parents strike back, killing them. 3 days later the mother pirces open her breast and pours her blood over her dead chicks, bringing them back to life. (Religious symbolism there). Other sources say that she is so attentive to her young she lets them feed on blood from her own breast. There – hope that was of interest, it is just that mythical beasts and such like was part of my degree thesis all those years ago!

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